Lens Flair

Esahubble_potw2229a_1024

esahubble_potw2229a July 18th, 2022

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Rigby

This intriguing observation from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows a gravitationally lensed galaxy with the long-winded identification SGAS J143845+145407. Gravitational lensing has resulted in a mirror image of the galaxy at the centre of this image, creating a captivating centrepiece. Gravitational lensing occurs when a massive celestial body — such as a galaxy cluster — causes a sufficient curvature of spacetime for the path of light around it to be visibly bent, as if by a lens. Appropriately, the body causing the light to curve is called a gravitational lens, and the distorted background object is referred to as being "lensed". Gravitational lensing can result in multiple images of the original galaxy, as seen in this image, or in the background object appearing as a distorted arc or even a ring. Another important consequence of this lensing distortion is magnification, allowing astronomers to observe objects that would otherwise be too far away or too faint to be seen. Hubble has a special flair for detecting lensed galaxies. The telescope's sensitivity and crystal-clear vision allow it to see faint and distant gravitational lenses that cannot be detected with ground-based telescopes because of the blurring effect of Earth's atmosphere. Hubble was the first telescope to resolve details within lensed images of galaxies, and is capable of imaging both their shape and internal structure. This particular lensed galaxy is from a set of Hubble observations that take advantage of gravitational lensing to peer inside galaxies in the early Universe. The lensing reveals details of distant galaxies that would otherwise be unobtainable, and this allows astronomers to determine star formation in early galaxies. This in turn gives scientists a better insight into how the overall evolution of galaxies has unfolded.   Links Video of Lens Flair

Provider: Hubble Space Telescope | ESA

Image Source: https://esahubble.org/images/potw2229a/

Curator: ESA/Hubble, Baltimore, MD, United States

Image Use Policy: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Image Details

Image Type
Observation
Esahubble_potw2229a_128
 

Position Details

Position (ICRS)
RA = 14h 38m 45.1s
DEC = 14° 54’ 11.8”
Orientation
North is 34.1° CCW
Field of View
1.6 x 1.6 arcminutes
Constellation
Bootes

Color Mapping

  Telescope Spectral Band Wavelength
Green Hubble (ACS) Optical (I) 814.0 nm
Blue Hubble (ACS) Optical (V) 606.0 nm
Red Hubble (WFC3) Infrared (JH) 1.4 µm
Spectrum_base
Green
Blue
Red
Esahubble_potw2229a_1280
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ID
potw2229a
Subject Category
Subject Name
Credits
ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Rigby
Release Date
2022-07-18T06:00:00
Lightyears
Redshift
Reference Url
https://esahubble.org/images/potw2229a/
Type
Observation
Image Quality
Distance Notes
Facility
Hubble Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope
Instrument
ACS, ACS, WFC3
Color Assignment
Green, Blue, Red
Band
Optical, Optical, Infrared
Bandpass
I, V, JH
Central Wavelength
814, 606, 1400
Start Time
Integration Time
Dataset ID
None, None, None
Notes
Coordinate Frame
ICRS
Equinox
J2000
Reference Value
219.68777337758914, 14.903283309898104
Reference Dimension
2354.0, 2330.0
Reference Pixel
1177.0, 1165.0
Scale
-1.1113752190197612e-05, 1.1113752190197612e-05
Rotation
34.099999999999831
Coordinate System Projection:
TAN
Quality
Full
FITS Header
Notes
Creator (Curator)
ESA/Hubble
URL
https://esahubble.org
Name
Email
Telephone
Address
ESA Office, Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr
City
Baltimore
State/Province
MD
Postal Code
21218
Country
United States
Rights
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Publisher
ESA/Hubble
Publisher ID
esahubble
Resource ID
potw2229a
Metadata Date
2022-06-29T22:48:37+02:00
Metadata Version
1.1
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Detailed color mapping information coming soon...

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There is no distance meta data in this image.