Starstruck in Terzan 4

Esahubble_potw2237a_1024

esahubble_potw2237a September 12th, 2022

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, R. Cohen

A glittering multitude of stars in the globular cluster Terzan 4 fill this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Globular clusters are collections of stars bound together by their mutual gravitational attraction, and can contain millions of individual stars. As this image shows, the heart of a globular cluster such as Terzan 4 is a densely packed, crowded field of stars — which makes for spectacular images! The launch of Hubble in 1990 revolutionised the study of globular clusters. The individual stars in these dense crowds are almost impossible to distinguish from one another with ground-based telescopes, but can be picked apart using space telescopes. Astronomers have taken advantage of Hubble’s crystal-clear vision to study the stars making up globular clusters, as well as how these systems change over time. This particular observation comes from astronomers using Hubble to explore Terzan 4 and other globular clusters to understand the shape, density, age, and structure of globular clusters close to the centre of the Milky Way. Unlike globular clusters elsewhere in the sky, these globular clusters have evaded detailed observation because of the clouds of gas and dust swirling around the galactic core. These clouds blot out starlight in a process that astronomers refer to as ‘extinction’, and complicate astronomical observations. Astronomers took advantage of the sensitivity of two of Hubble’s instruments — the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 — to overcome the impact of extinction on Terzan 4. By combining Hubble imagery with sophisticated data processing, astronomers were able to determine the ages of galactic globular clusters to within a billion years — a relatively accurate measurement in astronomical terms!

Provider: Hubble Space Telescope | ESA

Image Source: https://esahubble.org/images/potw2237a/

Curator: ESA/Hubble, Baltimore, MD, United States

Image Use Policy: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Image Details

Image Type
Observation
Esahubble_potw2237a_128
 

Position Details

Position (ICRS)
RA = 17h 30m 38.2s
DEC = -31° 35’ 43.4”
Orientation
North is 58.2° CW
Field of View
2.2 x 2.4 arcminutes
Constellation
Scorpius

Color Mapping

  Telescope Spectral Band Wavelength
Red Hubble (WFC3) Infrared (H) 1.6 µm
Green Hubble (WFC3) Infrared (YJ) 1.1 µm
Blue Hubble (ACS) Optical (V) 606.0 nm
Spectrum_base
Red
Green
Blue
Esahubble_potw2237a_1280
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ID
potw2237a
Subject Category
Subject Name
Credits
ESA/Hubble & NASA, R. Cohen
Release Date
2022-09-12T06:00:00
Lightyears
Redshift
Reference Url
https://esahubble.org/images/potw2237a/
Type
Observation
Image Quality
Distance Notes
Facility
Hubble Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope
Instrument
WFC3, WFC3, ACS
Color Assignment
Red, Green, Blue
Band
Infrared, Infrared, Optical
Bandpass
H, YJ, V
Central Wavelength
1600, 1100, 606
Start Time
Integration Time
Dataset ID
None, None, None
Notes
Coordinate Frame
ICRS
Equinox
J2000
Reference Value
262.6591448830804, -31.595399436871883
Reference Dimension
2611.0, 2888.0
Reference Pixel
1305.5, 1444.0
Scale
-1.389701101860615e-05, 1.389701101860615e-05
Rotation
-58.239999999999917
Coordinate System Projection:
TAN
Quality
Full
FITS Header
Notes
Creator (Curator)
ESA/Hubble
URL
https://esahubble.org
Name
Email
Telephone
Address
ESA Office, Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr
City
Baltimore
State/Province
MD
Postal Code
21218
Country
United States
Rights
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Publisher
ESA/Hubble
Publisher ID
esahubble
Resource ID
potw2237a
Metadata Date
2022-09-08T16:30:05+02:00
Metadata Version
1.1
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Detailed color mapping information coming soon...

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There is no distance meta data in this image.